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Description

The inaugural year of Madison’s Heritage has many important articles about the early history of Madison County. Several articles discuss early inhabitants and settlers in the county, various old buildings, and early transportation. There are a few articles on different church congregations and early businesses.

Description

The 1970 Madison Heritage articles cover a variety of subject matter. Many articles are about particular Madison Countians, including Madison County governors, Miss Belle Bennett, Kit Carson, William Wolfskill, Laura Clay, David Gass, John Miller, Emmanuel Oldham, and Cassius M. Clay. In 1970 we find the first of many “Bits and Pieces” articles written by Dr. Engle. These articles cluster together miscellaneous unconnected tidbits of information into one article. There are also several articles on events in Madison County’s past and an article about the important 1876 Beers Co. map of the county. Dr. Engle reminisces about “Famous Eating Places of Yesteryear,” beginning the first of many articles based on the authors’ growing up in the county. Dr. Grise shares information about telephones in the county, one of his many interests. “Love Triumphs,” “The Parkes Monkey Tale,” and “Strange Funeral Here in 1935” share information on some colorful events and people in our county’s past. The December 23rd article is the first of many descriptions of Christmas days of yore by Dr. Grise.

Description

Madison’s Heritage articles from 1971 cover many different, people, events, and buildings in our county’s history. Foundational businesses in the county including the Zaring Mill, Churchill Weavers, and Bybee Pottery are covered. There are several articles on education in the county and some articles on the important newspaper man and historian, French Tipton. In “The Sale of Vagrants,” Dr. Grise describes this interesting practice of our county’s past. In “Madison-Model, 1943-47” Dr. Engle recalls his high school sports reporting days, detailing baseball and basketball teams of the past.

Description

The 1972 Madison’s Heritage collection features a series on a 1937 survey of the county. Articles about floods and blizzards show the impact that weather has had on the county’s history. “Campus Murder Case” highlights one of the great unsolved mysteries in Berea’s history. Two articles draw from information gathered from an old newspaper, the Richmond Whig Chronicle from 1851. This series continues on into 1972. “A Moonlight School” gives some interesting knowledge about the county’s educational history. “An Uncommon Couple” and “Henry Allen Laine” show the importance of African American presence in the county’s history. “Where are they Now?” and “What Used to be There?” begin the first of many attempts by Dr. Engle to document the historical layout of downtown Richmond, complete with the businesses, churches, and government buildings that have shaped the town center.

Description

Many articles in the 1973 describe disasters in the county, including kidnappings, train wrecks, fires, severe storms, and long winters. Many articles also recount the rich military history of the county including Madison Countians’ involvement in the Revolutionary War, the Civil War, and World War I. “Madison’s Mallory Springs” and “The Other Boonesborough” detail recreational opportunities of the county’s past. “The Green-Faced Man” details one of the county’s exciting legends. “Recalling Doylesville Days” and “Excitement at Moberly” profile two of Madison County many villages. Many articles discuss the county’s educational heritage including the founding of Central University, Eastern Kentucky State Normal School, and Model. “The Miller Papers” discusses genealogies and important Madison County families (see also “William H. Miller, Genealogist,” 2/2/1972). The story of the 400 pound pioneer adds to the rich history of early settlers in the area.

Description

Many 1974 articles are about people in Madison County. Others are about important and intriguing early businesses in the county’s history including “Interesting Old Businesses,” “The Hume Cooperage Co.,” “Stafford’s Planing Mill,” “The Southern Lumber Co.,” and “Furniture Business in 1910.” Dr. Engle details a five part series on pastors of the First Presbyterian Church of Richmond. A couple articles detail the now forgotten village of Brookstown. “A Rough Life” gives the humorous account of the life of one Madison Countian. “The Pest House” recounts the interesting past of a forgotten institution and also shows the importance of reader input on the Madison’s Heritage column.

Description

The 1975 Madison’s Heritage collection contains many articles about pioneers and Indians. Other articles profile some Madison’s county government officials. Several articles give accounts of some of Madison County’s most important institutions, banks. “Waco in 1889,” “Flour Power” (about Potts’ Bonanza Mill), and “Madison’s Master Drummer” in turn continue the themes of villages, early businesses, and the African American and military heritage of the county. “Fire Bell Found” is one of the most outstanding instances of reader input and the interactive element of Madison’s Heritage. “Innocent Bystander was Slain” and “A Fatal Drink” recount some unfortunate accidents in our county’s history.

Description

The Madison’s Heritage articles from 1976 feature a series on Tates Creek Baptist Association and a series on the First Christian Church. Dr. Engle features a series on quotes from Collins’ History of Kentucky. Several articles add to the educational heritage of the county, recalling the Madison Female Institute and the Madison Male Academy. “Miss Clay Subject of Book” gives the first of many book reviews featured in Madison’s Heritage. It also brings additional light to the impact women had on the county’s history and Madison county women’s role in the women’s rights movement. “Dr. Sory Reaching 98” gives the account of the eye doctor who treated patients all over the state and set up a trachoma hospital in Richmond. Several articles in this collection feature Berea events and personalities and the changing downtown Richmond landscape. Other articles profile antiquated aspects of county life including taverns, public outrage about showing movies on Sunday, and public hangings.

Description

The 1977 Madison’s Heritage collection features a lengthy series relating local news items from 1930s. In “Boyhood Memories,” Dr. Engle reminisces about growing up in Richmond in the 1930s and ‘40s. There are several items on Eastern’ administration including presidents and deans. There is also a series on the First United Methodist Church, as well as other articles on local churches. “The Waco Pottery” details some of the county’s history of craftsmanship. Several articles feature automobiles and hospitals in the county’s past. “In the Early Morning” is one of the articles the authors have written about the Ku Klux Klan’s activities in the county’s past.

Description

Many articles published in Madison’s Heritage in 1977 have to do with Madison County villages and hamlets including College Hill, Speedwell, Kirksville, and Milford. In “When was that Place Started?,” Dr. Grise details some of the early establishment of many of these now-forgotten communities. There are several articles about life in the 1920s and some on the 1930s. “Daily Register Began in 1917” details the history of the Richmond Register from its founding. “Cemetery Monument Portrays ‘Estill Defeat’” gives information on the influential Estill and Irvine pioneers. There are some interesting articles about mysteries in our county’s history including John Smith’s lost silver mines and the Squire Boone rock. “Roberts was First Funeral Director” details the important history of the Oldham, Roberts, and Powell Funeral Home. “Boone Tavern Opened in 1909” gives an account of one of Madison County’s most prominent tourist attractions and repositories of history.

Description

Many articles in the 1979 collection of Madison’s Heritage detail pioneer tales and the exploits of Daniel Boone. In “Filling Stations have Replaced Some of Richmond’s Oldest Homes,” Dr. Engle details the struggle between progress and tradition and the phantom landscapes that exist all over Madison County in the memories of old timers and in our recorded histories. Some articles discuss the Lackey family of jailers and others give a picture of the conditions of early schools, while others give further insight to the ancient mound builders that inhabited the county. The village of Paint Lick is described by Dr. Grise in “Paint Lick Unusual Community.” “Livery Stable was on Irvine St” describes Billy Devore’s early Richmond business. “Outstanding Blacks in Madison County” gives information on influential African Americans from Madison County.

Description

The year 1980 contains articles on an assortment of different topics. Several articles mention events relating to circuses coming to town and “Tigers Ran Loose When Circus Train Wrecked” details a very unusual situation that occurred near Paint Lick in 1882. Two articles detail the plethora of information that can be gathered in the Townsend Room of the EKU Crabbe Library. A few articles give details on local churches. Important local figures including Mrs. Grant E. Lilly, Nathaniel Hart, and J.A.R Rogers are also discussed. In “More Stories About Mills,” Dr. Engle details the history of the Potts Mill on Paint Lick Creek.

Description

1981 features a series of articles which reprint Mrs. James W. Caperton’s paper delivered to the Boonesborough Chapter of the D.A.R. in 1930 entitled “Early Homes of Madison County, Kentucky.” In “Early Leaders of Women’s Rights Movement,” Mrs. Caperton sheds additional light on Mrs. James Bennett, early women’s rights leader. Interesting articles to note include “Rex Peavine was One of the Greatest Sires Ever” which features information on the legendary horse and “1940 Eastern Team Unbeaten and Untied” which recounts the triumphs of the Eastern football team.

Description

The articles from the 1982 collection of Madison’s Heritage cover a variety of subject matter. A series of articles is based on Bennett Young’s 1910 book, The Prehistoric Men of Kentucky, which details the ancient people who built mounds in the area. “‘Uncle Tom’s Cabin’ is in Garrard County” tells the story the literary fame of our neighboring county. “First Train Ran Here in November 1868” and “Kentucky’s First Roads were Buffalo Trails” give insight into our county’s past forms of transportation. The first of many articles based on old yearbooks give insight into Eastern in 1914. “Flag Stops for Trains had Names” tells of many forgotten train stops in the county. A couple of articles are based on a 1927 booklet, “Madison County, Kentucky—at the foot of the blue ridge—its possessions and opportunities.” Articles also profile Governor James McCreary, Congressman John White, and poetess Kate Rose Wiggins.

Description

1983 features a series of articles on the famous Clay family. Several articles feature information on antiquated newspapers including the Richmond Republican, the Berea Evangelist, and the Farmers’ Chronicle. There are several articles on Eastern’s leaders of the past, cemeteries of Madison County, and the Wellington Court subdivision. A series of articles is based on the book History of Kentucky Courthouses by Elisabeth Headley Garr and information is given about the famous iron fence that once circled the Richmond courthouse and is now on the grounds of the Richmond cemetery. “Richmond was Built Near Creek” details the path of Dreaming Creek, the waterway which meandered through Richmond’s downtown, said to be named by Daniel Boone himself.

Description

The 1984 collection of Madison’s Heritage features different series on Richmond businesses of the past. There is a lengthy series on old downtown businesses of the 1920-50 eras and a series on Richmond businesses of 1958 based on a city directory. There is also a lengthy and interesting series on outstanding men of Richmond and Richmond businesses based on information gathered from 1910 issue of the Richmond Climax newspaper. “Famous Poet Once Taught at Eastern” profiles former Eastern professor and Kentucky poet laureate James Thomas Cotton Noe. Several articles also feature information from different local church publications.

Description

There is a good series on the exploits of Cassius M. Clay featured in the 1985 collection of Madison’s Heritage. There is also a series on Masons in the county based on the 1914 book written by Robert R. Burnam, A History of Masonry in Madison County, Kentucky. There are several articles about sports in the county including an article mentioning the Tobacco League, which was founded in 1949 by Dr. Engle and ran through 1951. There are also several articles featuring churches including White Oak Pond Christian Church and First Baptist Church. “Library Named for President” tells of John Grant Crabbe and gives other interesting facts about Eastern’s past including Mozart the music-loving dog.

Description

Many articles published in Madison’s Heritage in 1986 are part of a series about leading Madison Countains, based on Robert R. Burnam’s book on masonry. 1986 also features a great series on the names of Madison County communities based on Kentucky Place Names by Robert Pennick and continued from the last article published in 1985. There is also a series based on a 1870s map of Richmond and a series about Robert H. Nice house on West Main St. in Richmond. A few articles profile the Elliott Institute which was located in Kirksville. “Library has Long History” provides information on Eastern’s library and “Markers Reveal History” gives a good overview of historically significant locations in the county.

Description

Many articles in the 1987 collection of Madison’s Heritage concern people, businesses, and pioneers. Lesser known pioneers including the Girty brothers, Simon Kenton, John Findley, and John Stuart are discussed for their contributions to the county’s early history. Several articles in the 1987 collection deal with sports in the county, covering the Madison-Model Royal Purples, Waco High Cardinals, and Red House teams. “City Once had Mule-Drawn Street Cars” and “Mules Have Place in Madison History” discuss this important animal’s contribution to transportation and agriculture in our county’s past. A couple of articles discuss the historic Blair House in Richmond.

Description

1988 features several interesting series on county people and institutions. Several articles deal with local legends Cassius M. Clay and Daniel Boone. There is also a series based on a 1906 directory which details old businesses in the county and other interesting facts. There is a good series on city schools from a 1926 bulletin, as well as a series on the Cane Spring Baptist Church. A few articles give some insight into the early history of Berea and others detail some of the treasures that may be found in the EKU archives. “Here’s the Story of the Hermit of College Hill” gives one of the most curious and fascinating stories of our county’s past.

Description

The 1989 collection of Madison’s Heritage features a good series on the Arlington House and the Hanger family. There is also a lengthy and interesting series profiling past Eastern faculty members based on information from professor Maude Gibson written in1936. There are also several articles on the impact of World War II on Madison County, as well as articles on buildings that once stood on Eastern’s campus including Memorial Hall, Miller Gymnasium, and the faculty cottages. “Madison High Site has Long History” details the history of the site now occupied by Madison Middle School. “The Mystery of the Cast Iron Coffin” relates a quirky incident in our county’s past.

Description

Many articles in the 1990 Madison’s Heritage collection deal with education in the county. There is a series on EKU’s Crabbe Library and other articles about Eastern, Berea, Central University, and local high schools. “Why Did Model Disappear, Return?” gives insight into the school’s struggle in the 1920s and ‘30s. Dr. Engle features several articles about sports in the county including the interesting articles, “District Once had Many Teams” and “All-Time High Score Remembered for 66 Years.” Articles on corn and tobacco evidence our county’s agricultural heritage. “How Well Do You Know Local History” gives a quiz to readers about Madison County history.

Description

Articles from the 1991 collection are characterized by variety. There is a good series about the location of county schools based on a 1934 Madison County Health Department map. There are also several articles based on information gathered from a 1939 newspaper. “Women have Played Major Role in Local History” and “Separate Hospital for Blacks Died of Financial Causes” show the influence women and African Americans have had on the county. A few articles discuss different characteristics of our transportation system of the past. Several articles discuss disasters including fires, train wrecks, and tornadoes. “Rev. Breck Gave Much to Madison County” profiles Robert L. Breck, first Chancellor of Central University. “Court Day Celebration Lured Big Crowds Here” details an exciting occasion that was central to our county’s monthly schedule.

Description

The 1992 collection of Madison’s Heritage articles features a variety of subject matter, with articles on education, events, transportation, and government among other topics. Dr. Grise gives an overview of the tornado that hit Madison County in 1974, during the fifth year of the Madison’s Heritage column. Several articles give further information on Eastern including student life, dorm life, and the founding of the Stateland Farm. “School Nicknames, Colors” gives interesting information on local schools. Articles on the Battle of Richmond and Daniel Boone highlight some of the most important events in our county’s history. “A Thumbnail History of Madison County” gives an overview of the early history of Madison County. “The Ferry at Poosey Ridge” details the ferries that once existed all around the county, while a series of articles on the RNIB Railroad describe this important railway. Several other articles give information on county Baptist churches.

Description

1993 features a very good series based on French Tipton’s chronology, one of the most important early sets of documents on our county’s early history, now housed in the EKU Library Archives. The chronology tells the history of the county from 1785-1899, and the Madison’s Heritage articles published in 1993 give an overview of Tipton’s information on the 1820s through the turn of the century. The authors continue to reflect on events, people, and businesses that impacted the county after the beginning of the Madison’s Heritage column through a long series on life in 1975. Other articles deal with courts, cars, and locals going to Missouri. “34 Madison Residents were Killed in WWI” reflects the service and sacrifice Madison Countians have given to their country.

Description

The year 1994 features a series on early lawyers in Madison County based on a section of the French Tipton papers entitled “Lawyers and Lawmakers.” There is also a series based on information from old 1960s Madison High Yearbooks. Several articles give background on the Blue Grass Ordnance (Army) Depot, one of the most important institutions in our county over the past century. There are also several articles on influential people in Madison County’s history including Melvin E. Maddox, Green Clay Smith, and John Speed Smith. Dr. Grise recounts an important event in the history of Berea and Berea College in “Article Recalls Exodus of Teachers from Berea.” Other articles discuss the history of opera houses in downtown Richmond and “Local Singer's Life was Like a Novel” profiles the intriguing life of nightclub singer Rio Burke. “‘Madison's Heritage’ Becoming Part of Madison's History” gives information and a history on the impact of the Madison’s Heritage column.

Description

1995 can be considered the yearbook edition of Madison’s Heritage. The authors cover information gathered from yearbooks from Madison Central, Kirksville High, Waco High, and Berea High from different years from the late 1930s through the 1950s. There are also articles that feature the communities of Speedwell and Union City. A couple of articles give insight into the construction of the Clays Ferry Bridge. “Telford Center's Roots Began in Late 1890s” and “Turley House Holds Years of Local History” provide information about two buildings that are very important to Richmond’s heritage. “Westinghouse was First Big-Name Factory” gives information on the important industry that came into the area around 1950. “Second St. 'Shoot-Out' Remembered at Death of Richmond Marshall” tells of the famous gunfight that took place in downtown Richmond.

Description

There is a good series based on information from several issues of the Madison-Model High newspaper The Purple and White from the years 1937-39 featured in the 1996 collection of Madison’s Heritage. There is also a series based on Kingston High yearbooks from the 1950s and there are other articles on Kingston High sports. A series on the Berea public school system describes schools from 1855-1930. The village of Peytontown is described in “Peytontown has Rich History of Railroads, Blacksmiths” and the historic home named Blythewood is discussed in “Details of 1840s Home, Blythewood, Remembered From 1990 Auction.” Local character and beloved cook, Mammy Lou is profiled in “Clever Cook's Corn Breads Purchased Freedom for Herself and Her Family.”

Description

The 1997 collection of Madison’s Heritage features several articles on Kingston High School from 1939-55 based on information from a 1992 reunion booklet. The series on the Madison-Model High 1940s newspaper, Purple and White is continued from 1996. There is also a series on the Berea Foundation School in the 1950s and a series about letters written to Richmond leaders in 1922 by Judge J.A. Sullivan. Other articles concern buildings on Eastern’s campus, sports in the county, tobacco, and the Gibson Hospital. “Foster Music Camp's History Stretches from 1936” gives information on this enduring program.

Description

The 1998 collection of Madison’s Heritage offers information on a variety of subjects including education, businesses, government, and the early years in the county. There is a good series on Richmond High, the African American city school, as well as a few articles on the county rural schools, Berea Foundation, Eastern, and Central University. There is also a series on Richmond in 1937. “Madison County Did Its Part in the War of 1812” sheds additional light on the county’s involvement in the nation’s military struggles.

Description

This collection features historic photographs and articles relating to Madison's Heritage that are not included in the year collections.